The spat between the US and Turkey is currently roiling various markets, with the greatest impact being felt by other emerging market economies. While there are fundamental reasons to be

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If you’re wondering what is driving markets right now you’re not alone. 2018 has been characterized by a lot of noise and the pace of today’s news cycle makes it seemingly impossible for markets to fully digest current events before new ones crowd out yesterday’s news.

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Strong wage growth in January ignited inflation concerns and sent equity markets tumbling   Talk of tariffs and trade barriers in March further dented already fragile investor sentiment   The

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2017 was a good year for markets, almost too good in fact.  For the first time in history, the S&P 500 Index had no negative months during the calendar year.

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Equity-market volatility hit an all-time low in Q3 Low volatility and strong equity markets were likely the result of improved economic fundamentals during the period On the other hand, policy

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Trump’s agenda of regulatory rollback, infrastructure spending and tax cuts is all but stuck in Washington’s ideologically fractured environment. Strong earnings made up for stalled policy and a lack of

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The so-called “Trump Trade” began to lose steam toward the end of Q1 as it became clear that single-party control in Washington wouldn’t necessarily translate into quick results Events abroad

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Markets had a hard reset in Q4 with the election of Donald Trump on November 8th. Initially global equity markets plunged, but within hours began to recover and rallied strongly throughout the quarter, mostly on speculation that the new president would usher in tax cuts, deregulation and a sweeping fiscal spending program.

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In the wake of “Brexit,” central banks reasserted themselves over markets in a big way in Q3, sending bond yields to historic lows. The recent wave of populism in the developed world is targeting institutions that have been supportive of capital markets for the better part of 70 years. To the extent these political movements prevail, they would likely carry negative economic consequences.

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